How can VOCs affect human health?

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Whether or not a person will have health effects after breathing in VOCs depends on:

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    The toxicity of the chemical

    The amount of harm that can be caused by contact with the chemical.

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    How much of the chemical is in the air

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    How long and how often the air is breathed

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Differences in age, health condition, gender and exposure to other chemicals also can affect whether or not a person will have health effects.


Chemicals can enter the body through three major pathways (breathing, touching or swallowing). This is referred to as exposure. So if you smoke off a pipe that smells like orange… you might be exposed!

Short-term exposure to high levels of some VOCs can cause headaches, dizziness, light-headedness, drowsiness, nausea, and eye and respiratory irritation. (All commercially available and home made solutions are 100% VOC)

These effects usually go away after the exposure stops. In laboratory animals, longterm exposure to high levels of some VOCs has caused cancer and affected the liver, kidney and nervous system. In general, we recommend minimizing exposure to chemicals, if possible. We agree with these government finds… Limit your exposure to home made cleaners and all other commercially available bong cleaners… Ask yourself “What’s in your cleaner?” and buy a bottle of Kryptonite.